Dealing with High School Stress

Trinity Turner, Writer

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It is said that high school is the main source of stress for teens. Everything changes when students get to high school. They must maintain grades more seriously if they want a good GPA to get into a good college.  If they have trouble with procrastination, the stress is even more compounded due to all the extracurricular activities, such as work, sports, and academic clubs. Stressing to get everything done can really take a toll on high school students.

We all go through things in life outside of school, whether it has to do with family, health, or relationships, but doing well in school is often a ticket out of current situations. Try to keep situations such as these from affecting your education by following some of these suggestions by therapists and counselors.  

Exercising can be a big help in relieving stress. Find something you enjoy doing that involves moving your body. Activities such as running, working out, hiking, or biking is scientifically proven to hell reduce stress.

Simply being outdoors is soothing for some people. Find a spot in the sun or shade (depending on your preference) and relax with nature.

Getting enough shut eye is a big stress-reliever. A lot of students run off of 6 hours or less of sleep because of electronics and social media. Experts say you should get a minimum of 8 hours sleep a night. Unfortunately, being stressed can cause insomnia, and if you find yourself in an anxious state, you’ll have a hard time getting the sleep you need to feel less stressed.

To help combat anxiety and insomnia, try clearing your head of all thoughts by listening to music — particularly calming tunes — or taking a non-habit-forming sleeping aid.

We all have different ways of dealing with stress. Other suggestions are: talking to close family or friends, watching a favorite tv show, or doing yoga. When students here at Cartersville High were asked how they deal with stress, responses varied.

Junior Kristina Weiss said, “When dealing with stress I like to draw and listen to music. I speak through my drawings.”

Football player Dadrian Dennis answered, “Working out… relieves me of all the built-up stress, it’s like my therapy.”

Still others said just writing thoughts down in a journal helps.

The point is, as high school students in modern society, we all deal with extraordinary amounts of stress, and we all take different steps to handle it. The important thing is to handle it, not ignore it.